The Birmingham Christmas Market

cm figuresEven after twelve years successful years, Birmingham’s German market is still attracting over 3 million visitors each year. Having become quite a popular and profitable Christmas tradition, numerous German-style Christmas markets have cropped up all over Britain in the last fifteen years. However Birmingham’s market has managed to remain the largest German-style Christmas market outside Germany and the German-speaking countries. Running from the 14th of November until 22nd December, the population of Birmingham and the many tourists who flock to the city centre around Christmas have ample time to pay the market a visit. The market follows the length of New Street, winds up around Victoria and Chamberlain square and concludes in Centenary Square by Symphony Hall. In order to have a proper look around the stalls I’d advise avoiding the weekend, going on a week-night evening, so as to avoid the crowds whilst still soaking up the evening atmosphere.

In terms of what the German market has to offer; to ask what it doesn’t have to offer seems more appropriate. For me, the food stalls were especially appealing, and one recommendation would definitely be to go there hungry. With so much food on offer, and the impossibility of being able sample it all, I would choose carefully. The authentic Bratwurst sausages, cooked on an open fire, or the pulled-pork rolls are just some of the hot foods that the market has to offer. However for those with more of a sweet tooth, there are a plethora of sweet food and chocolate stalls too. One stall that caught my eye was serving handmade chocolate that had been carved into different pieces of extremely realistic looking machinery and tools.

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Whilst food takes prominence in the market, there are also a tempting range of
hand-crafted gifts which you can spend a great deal of time and money on if you’re not careful. The market provides a perfect opportunity to buy Christmas gifts with a personal touch, from beautifully hand-crafted toys for children to silver jewellery, handmade soaps and candles, to authentic sheepskin rugs and clothes.

Another stall which I found fascinating was selling metal figures that had been crafted to resemble famous characters from films, one of which was a very ominous (too big for my liking) predator figurine.

cm modelsAs well as being great for picking up unusual gifts and trinkets, the market also has a number of bars where you can stop and get a drink. A few are set up outside but there are also a handful which have indoor areas, all wooden-clad, they are usually tucked away behind the bar. On the rare occasion there’s some free space to sit down it provides a welcome break from the cold outside where you can enjoy some mulled wine or hot chocolate.

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The one thing I love about this market and what is ever-present in it year after
year, is its authenticity. The wooden cladding of the stalls and their produce look like they’ve been plucked straight out of a small German town and dropped in the middle of Birmingham. The dual-language of the stall signs in both German and English contribute to their authentic nature, and even most of the stall-owners seem to be German. I think this aspect is what makes them particularly attractive, and provides a different take on the high-pressure, stressful process that is Christmas shopping.

CM chocolatesThere have been recent arguments about the clichéd nature and dwindling novelty of the German market tradition since their success has created a ripple effect all over Britain. One article in The Guardian said, “What was once a charming, mildly exotic ‘alternative’ has now become about as painfully predictable as a trip to Boots.” Maybe I haven’t visited the market enough to become bored of its “predictability,” and whilst some of what you find that it can be tacky and clichéd, I stand firm by the idea that the German market is and will remain an enjoyable, alternative evening out for friends, couples and families who will always prefer something a little different to the overcrowded highly commercial shopping centres.

By Elin Morris
@ElinMorris2509

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